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Spriter Official Reference Implementations and Other Big News

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Hi everyone,

We're pleased to announce that at long last the wait for a fully featured and officially supported reference implementation for Spriter is at and end.

The first two languages to receive officially supported, feature complete implementations are C# and C++.

The C++ implementation is being created by myself, and should be ready for public testing in the very near future.

For the C# implementation, we'd like to give a huge thanks to community member Loodakrawa for having created it, and for working with us to make it totally feature complete, officially supported C# reference implementation.  Loodakrawa was also nice enough to agree (and take the necessary steps) to change it's license to the zlib license, which is among the most permissive licenses available. This is the license all officially supported Spriter implementations will be released under. We encourage anyone who wants to port either implementation (or future released implementations) under the same license.

In summary:

The license only has the following points to be accounted for:

  • Software is used on 'as-is' basis. Authors are not liable for any damages arising from its use.
  • The distribution of a modified version of the software is subject to the following restrictions:
    • The authorship of the original software must not be misrepresented,
    • Altered source versions must not be misrepresented as being the original software, and
    • The license notice must not be removed from source distributions.
The license does not require source code to be made available if distributing binary code.

It should be very easy to port to any language of your choice with a simple copy/paste, and edit.  Also, these will be easy to adapt to any game engine or authoring tool (There is an example in the C# implementation working in Monogame).

Shortly after the release of the C++ implementation, we'll be working to port one of the two implementation to JavaScript.

We're also pleased to announce we'll be working with the folks at ClickTeam to make sure Spriter is fully supported in their latest authoring system - Fusion 3 (not yet released).

Similarly, we'll be working with Enterbrain, the creators of RPG Maker, to add Spriter support to their upcoming RPG Maker MV, which is already available for pre-order.

Once these initial reference implementations are fully tested we'll also be contacting and working with the developers of as many popular authoring systems as possible to get full Spriter support ported to their respective packages as soon as possible, so please dive in and give these implementations a test spin. Please report any bugs with the C# version to Loodakrawa's thread. The sooner we make sure they're rock solid, the sooner full Spriter support becomes commonplace for all game developers. This is currently our top priority.

In addition to this, we will be starting a thread in the near future of all ports, either complete or in the works. We will of course post any that we are directly involved with, but we encourage you to post in that thread to let us know if you're creating a port, or if it's already complete.

While the community is helping us to test and perfect these current reference implementations, we'll be working on a Spriter update build, which will hopefully increase compatibility (most notably we'll be attempting to resolved issues with Retina Displays and Wacom input devices) as well as resolve some known bugs.

As always, we greatly appreciate and are humbled by your patience and support during the long delay in meeting this critical milestone. Once this testing is complete, getting full Spriter support for any particular language or authoring system should be much easier and faster, even trivial.

In the mean time, we definitely owe you an explanation for why the full implementation took so long:

Our initial intent was to not only create a reference implementation which would support all of Spriter's current features, but which would also have the flexibility to support the substantial amount of future features we already have planned. Of course, the attempt to meet these goals necessitated fleshing out the requirements and nuances of the planned features, and taking time to make sure the structure of the reference implementation would leave the room and flexibility to easily incorporate them when the time came.

This lead to a sort of tug of war, between the potential power and flexibility of the new features, the development time to finish the first release of the reference implementation, and the limits imposed by what the current Spriter data structure could accommodate.

While grueling and time consuming, there was steady progress in many aspects of feature design, data handling routines, etc. The concepts and possibilities we discovered during this process were encouraging enough to postpone our eventual realization that unless we tweaked our approach and our actual goal, we'd be making too great a compromise, both imposing too long a wait on our users for support of the current features, and too great a compromise on the future flexibility of Spriter - with truncated versions of our new and powerful concepts shoehorned into compatibility with the current data structure.

We realized the only reasonable thing to do was to break this initial goal into three separate goals, so that milestones useful to Spriter users could be reached much more quickly:

  • Get support for all current Spriter features publicly released and available for all Spriter users ASAP.
  • While this support is getting ported to as many languages and authoring systems as quickly as possible, work on an update build of Spriter, increasing compatibility and resolving as many known issues as possible. We'll also take this opportunity to add a couple of simple features specifically geared to improving work-flow.
  • Once the update build(s) improve the current iteration of Spriter, we'll shift our focus back towards continuing where development of the future proof, uncompromising Spriter engine and data format left off. We've already made significant progress on this new core. It's a completely new design, and will be the foundation upon which we will build a new and improved Spriter, with a much more powerful and flexible feature-set.
And with that, we'd like to announce our plans to develop Spriter 2. We can't disclose too much information about it or it's new features yet, but we can tell you that Spriter 2 Pro will be a free upgrade to all current Spriter Pro users. We will reveal more as things develop.

Cheers!

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And with that, we'd like to announce our plans to develop Spriter 2. We can't disclose too much information about it or it's new features yet, but we can tell you that Spriter 2 Pro will be a free upgrade to all current Spriter Pro users. We will reveal more as things develop.

Cheers!

 

Ho-lly s***!!! Spriter pro 2? Daaaamn, color me very excited!

One think I would love to see is Spirter implementation in Game Maker! DO IT!!  Also it would be awesome if we could get a plug in for PSD files to export images directly to Spriter. 

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This is an amazing news

 

congrats guys!

 

just curious, will Spriter 2 be an entirely new program or more of an update to the current one?

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Hi everyone, the C++ implementation should be feature-complete and ready for public testing by next Sunday (November 1st).
 

Great news, now I can just sit and wait for JavaScript support :D
Plz use "scon" file for JavaScript runtime since JSON is better and easier to work with in JavaScript world.

We will definitely use scon for those reasons in the JavaScript version.
 

Ho-lly s***!!! Spriter pro 2? Daaaamn, color me very excited!
One think I would love to see is Spirter implementation in Game Maker! DO IT!!  Also it would be awesome if we could get a plug in for PSD files to export images directly to Spriter.

Do you mean something like this?
 

Great news.
 
Can we have also the scml reference updated in the following link to see the changes :)
 
http://www.brashmonkey.com/ScmlDocs/ScmlReference.html

The reference implementations will supercede that document, but if anyone needs it, we can also post a new reference to the format itself at some point.
 

So when we can expect new version that would add ability to change multiple curves into S curve ? Also bug fix for child bones getting keyframes from parent bones for no reason.

Spriter 2 will have much more flexible easing curves and should be able to accommodate the sorts of things you described in your thread.  We will look into the bug with the extra child keyframes when we're putting out the upcoming bug fix updates.  

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This is an amazing news

 

congrats guys!

 

just curious, will Spriter 2 be an entirely new program or more of an update to the current one?

 

Sort of both.. It will very much resemble the current Spriter, and be very easy to use for current Spriter users, but nearly every aspect of its feature set will be enhanced,. more flexible etc. We'll share more info about it at a later date.... For now our focus is widespread support for Spriter (the current version) and for update builds to improve what's already there.

 

cheers.

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1 hour ago, trashdinner said:

I just bought a Spriter pro licence not even a week ago ... will the Spriter 2 upgrade come free to pro users? Thx

EDIT: Nevermind .. I skiped the last line for some reason:D

Yes, everyone who purchases Spriter Pro t any time before the release of Spriter 2 will get Spriter 2 as a free upgrade once it's out.

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Spriter 2 will have much more flexible easing curves and should be able to accommodate the sorts of things you described in your thread.  We will look into the bug with the extra child keyframes when we're putting out the upcoming bug fix updates.  

That's cool but there's no need for super advanced flexible curves, simple 2 point cubic curve is enough to create smooth S that will satisfy most needs and make animations less linear.Bezier curves are fine but its just about creating ease in/ease out, most of the time im using 2 point cubic and first point to very bottom and second point to very top, some preset for that would help cause i dont want to create it myself everytime im using custom curve, sometimes i adjust it and make it look less S  but it depends how many keyframes i have and motion direction between keyframes.Option/Switch to use S curve by default when creating new keyframes would be also nice because most of the time i dont want linear curves.

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On Monday, November 02, 2015 3:19:27, bwwd said:

That's cool but there's no need for super advanced flexible curves, simple 2 point cubic curve is enough to create smooth S that will satisfy most needs and make animations less linear.Bezier curves are fine but its just about creating ease in/ease out, most of the time im using 2 point cubic and first point to very bottom and second point to very top, some preset for that would help cause i dont want to create it myself everytime im using custom curve, sometimes i adjust it and make it look less S  but it depends how many keyframes i have and motion direction between keyframes.Option/Switch to use S curve by default when creating new keyframes would be also nice because most of the time i dont want linear curves.

Spriter Pro already offers extremely flexible curves. I was not talking about specific curve shape control. I was referring to flexibility of what the curves can be applied to, specifically much easier control of affecting specific durations of the animation, not limited to or hindered by the key frames of any given object, things of that sort. The ability to copy/paste curve settings and to set a default curve will certainly also be explored.

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